It is a given, mobile technology is at the forefront of our digital lives and, well, I for one spend most of my public transportation time tweeting from my BlackBerry. Correction: transportation time. [And here is the disclaimer: I don’t tweet and drive. I just quit driving a couple of years back, at least in Paris where I live now.]

Expectations
Not only do I tweet on public transportation time but I also start and maintain conversations with transportation companies (airlines and train so far) across the globe when I happen to be one of their million customers. And of course, I do want my voice to be heard when I need to talk to them *AND* I want them to reply to me and find a solution to whatever issue I’m facing while in their hands. Of course, I expect all of that to happen in a timely manner too, given that our communication channel is a real-time wire – Twitter.

Three Real Stories – Cases
I have been able to experiment a few times the crisis communication dis/abilities of some airlines and of a train company over the past eight months so I’ve decided to share the stories to see how they constitute cases for various levels of crises. All of those happened over Twitter, on my handle, Merrybubbles. There will be three of them, like the three monkeys on the picture below (taken during a trip to Barcelona in January). Three Twitter encounters with transportation companies’ customer services. I will go through them in reverse chronological order.


Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil

Who? Where?
The first installment will be about Eurostar, zipping back and forth between Paris and London. The second one will take us to the marvelous world of Delta Airlines@DeltaAssist service while in Atlanta, GA. And the third one will see us onboard and on the ground with Cathay Pacific in Singapore and Hong Kong.

The series will start on Monday so please, stay tuned!

If you already have Twitter ‘tales’ with customer services to share, drop me a line in comments!

See you on Monday and enjoy a peaceful weekend all. Don’t forget to lend a hand to Japan while you’re in front of your computer – they still need us.

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Comments
  1. Tweeting has really become a way for customers to give feedback to companies as well as a way to air their complaints. It’s great that companies are catching up on using social media to answer questions regarding their services. I’ll be looking forward to your posts.

  2. […] post is the first installment of the three-part series on Twitter’s Voice In Transportation Customer Service: Three Cases. Putting companies through the social CRM […]

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